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Don’t Make Me Rattle is Having a Book-Birthday on Feb 25th!

screenshot from YouTube video book birthday Feb 25

Lyric Power Publishing LLC is happy to announce we’re celebrating the birthday of our fun, informative, and boldly illustrated book, Don’t Make Me Rattle!

Snazzy the Snake is hosting our celebration! February 25th marks the birthday of Don’t Make Me Rattle!, the rhyming book by author Elaine A. Powers full of rattlesnake facts and vibrant illustrations.

While Elaine writes to make science education fun, she writes particularly about rattlers so we can respect, not fear, them. They are shy creatures who prefer not to engage with humans. The rattle is only a warning: Please stay away!

Learn the rattlesnake’s role in the ecosystem, about their fascinating social behavior, how the venom is used by the rattlers, and much, much more in this 40-page book with bold illustrations by illustrator Nicholas Thorpe.

See Snazzy celebrate on YouTube at the Birthday Book!

Find the birthday book here at Lyric Power Publishing LLC and at ElaineAPowers.com. Don’t Make Me Rattle! is for sale at Amazon.com.

#educationalchildrensbook   #bookaboutsnakes   #rattlesnakes   #animation   #3dcharacter   #picturebookbirthday   #nonfictionpicturebook   #storytimeforkids   #nonfictionbooks

infographic complete book description of book Don't Make Me Rattle

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Author Elaine A. Powers Shares Her New Newsletter

Lyric Power Publishing LLC is pleased to announce that author Elaine A. Powers is publishing a new newsletter highlighting book announcements and specials. The latest issue features a Curtis Curly-tail book having a birthday today: Curtis Curly-tail is Lizardnapped was ‘born’ on  February 11th!

Please click here to see Elaine’s colorful, graphic newsletter; to click through to the birthday celebration video; and to subscribe to her newsletter and follow her journey and passion to help make learning science fun!

The birthday book!

a children's book cover, blue and white, with several curly-tail lizards on the cover
Curtis Curly-tail becomes the
unfortunate victim of poachers,
along with other protected animals.
Who will save them?
An Adventure Tale
For Readers Age 10+
Lovely Colored Pencil
Illustrations by
Jessica Minns
30 Pages
In the third book of the series, the very curious Curtis Curly-tail mistakes a poacher for a tourist wanting to snap a picture of his perfectly-curled tail. Instead, he is captured, along with critically endangered native plants, Conch and Iguanas.
Together the animals plot their escape from the dangerous poachers. Who will help them? How will they get free of the cages on a boat and return home safely to Warderick Wells?
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Curtis Curly-tail is Having a Book-Birthday

a children's book cover, blue and white, with several curly-tail lizards on the cover

Lyric Power Publishing LLC is pleased to announce the “birth” day of the book above: Curtis Curly-tail is Lizardnapped (an adventure tale featuring endangered flora and fauna of The Bahamas) is four years old this month. And we have created a video to celebrate!

The video can be seen on YouTube at Curtis Curly-tail Speaks.

In the third book of the series, the very curious Curtis Curly-tail mistakes a poacher for a tourist wanting to snap a picture of his perfectly-curled tail. Instead, he is captured, along with critically endangered native plants, Conch and Iguanas. Together the animals plot their escape from the dangerous poachers, but they can’t do it alone. Who will help them? How will they get free of the cages on a speeding boat and return home safely to Warderick Wells?

An Adventure Tale For Readers Age 10+
Lovely Colored Pencil Illustrations by Jessica Minns/30 Pages

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Book Review by Helene Woodhams of “How to Eat Breakfast”

graphic image of a blue book cover with the heads of a little girl and animals on it

Book Review by Helene Woodhams/Arizona Daily Star

How to Eat Breakfast
Available at Amazon.com

By Gene Twaronite, Illustrated by Diane Ronning. Independently published. $12.99 paperback, $5.95 Kindle.

Who doesn’t love a scrumptious breakfast? A yummy stack of pancakes is just waiting for her to dig in, but Wanda’s imagination is on the loose, conjuring up what her breakfast might look like if she were a whale or a giraffe, a hummingbird or a koala in a eucalyptus tree. A vulture’s breakfast probably wouldn’t be much fun to eat, she supposes, but if she were a termite she could eat the whole house! Tucsonan Gene Twaronite is a poet, essayist, and children’s author who knows a thing or two about making breakfast entertaining, while imparting a bit of rhyming nature lore. This latest offering, great for a read-aloud, includes lively illustrations by Diane Ronning, who likes to draw and paint at the breakfast table.

Review at The Arizona Daily Star

Get to know the author, Gene Twaronite, at his website: The Twaronite Zone.

Learn more about Diane Ronning at her website www.dianeronning.com or www.dianeronning.blogspot.com.

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What’s in a Name? Do You Mean the Common Name or the Scientific Name? by Elaine A. Powers, Author

In my stories and picture books published here by Lyric Power Publishing LLC, I include the scientific names, along with the common names, of the animals and plants I write about. Sometimes, I have to use different common names because each locale has its own unique twist. Like the gumbo limbo tree is also called red bird, and the banaquit is the banana bird.

I learned this doing my research while writing my children’s story called Grow Home, Little Seeds, which is a tale of friendship and of establishing one’s own home, told from the point of view of a bundle of tree seeds. I weave science into story because it makes the science fun and it tends to stick that way. The seeds have a great adventure finding their way together, and they are sweetly illustrated by artist and illustrator, Monique Carroll. Her beautiful botanical illustrations of the trees are featured in the Seed Appendix in the back of the book, which lists both the common and scientific names of all the trees. The book is a great tool for teaching children about trees and the need for their own micro-environments.

a book cover of a nature preserve, where seeds are cultivated. Seeds are drawn as cute characters
A Lyric Power Publishing book about seeds longing for a home. Yes, all of life longs to find its own special place to belong.

Scientists prefer to use taxonomic names because common names are often different from each other, while scientific names are consistent around the world. Scientific names consist of the genus and species, with a descriptive term from Latin or Greek. The genus comes before the species level. Members of a genus are species with common features.  Members of a genus can interbreed and produce fertile offspring.

A species is defined as a group of organisms that can reproduce with each other in nature and produce fertile offspring. It is the most basic category in the taxonomic system. When writing an organism’s scientific name, the genus name is capitalized, and the species name is written in lower case letters.

But scientific names can be changed as well. The fish, the guppy, that I did my master’s research project on was originally named Poecilia reticulata but was also known as Lebistes reticulatus when I was doing my research. Things can get confusing when the taxonomers can’t agree if a group of fish are the same species. Fortunately, DNA identification has helped clear up some of the confusion.

I encourage you to take the time to learn the scientific names of the living organisms all around you. It’s actually lots of fun once you get started learning them. I’ll start you off with an easy one here, the green iguana, Algae, pictured below, whose scientific name is Iguana iguana.

Green Iguana, Algae, on an enclosure.
Algae, a green iguana I rescued and brought home with me, is an Iguana iguana

a book cover featuring a blue iguana, listing all of the work and activity sheets includedYou can learn all about iguanas in the Lyric Power Publishing workbook, My Unit Study on Iguanas. The scientific name for the Grand Cayman blue iguana featured on the cover is Cyclura lewisi. The workbooks and activity sheets published by LPP are fun and interesting and help support educational goals at school and at home. They are downloaded once, and you can print as many copies as you’d like.

MY UNIT STUDY ON IGUANAS is thirty pages of iguana information and fun activity sheets for grades 2-4. Includes coloring pages, fact sheets, T/F about reptiles, parts of an iguana coloring page, compare animal traits, name matching, count and classify, reptile spelling page, life cycle of the iguana cut-and-paste activity, ecology word problems, iguana word problems, creative writing prompt, opinion writing exercise, mean, mode, median, and range worksheets, counting iguanas, histogram worksheet, grams-to-pounds worksheet, trace the words and color, short i sound, and create an iguana puzzle.

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How “How to Eat Breakfast” Came to Be by Author Gene Twaronite

graphic image of a blue book cover with the heads of a little girl and animals on it

I thought of How to Eat Breakfast as a simple story that would be both fun and educational–I did not set out to make a rhyming picture book. But as a I wrote, the words began to play against each other, often in ways I had not expected, sometimes rhyming at the end of lines and sometimes in the middle. I created strong images throughout the story, but talented illustrator Diane Ronning made them jump off the page. That is the wonderful magic of a picture book—the way it blends words and illustrations into a new way of seeing. It is sort of like the way we hear words differently when put to music. In each case, a wholly new art form emerges.

When Diane showed me a sample drawing for How to Eat Breakfast, I was blown away by how she visualized the main character. She brought Wanda to life, and I saw things about her that even I didn’t know. In the months that followed, I smiled with joy with each new illustration and how well she captured the images I tried to convey. Ever since 1987, when I published my first children’s story in Highlights for Children, I have dreamed of writing and publishing a picture book. This is my first, and it would not have been possible without Diane.

~Gene Twaronite

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New YouTube Video Starring Curtis Curly-tail and Roadrunner!

screenshot from a YouTube video about roadrunners, with Curtis Curly-tail lizard

Lyric Power Publishing LLC invites Curtis Curly-tail Lizard to
announce his new YouTube video at Curtis Curly-tail Speaks!

photo of curly-tail lizard on the beach
Not only is THIS a Curly-tail lizard–it’s Curtis! He’s the little guy who started Elaine on her second career as a children’s science book writer.

 

“Hello, everyone! I’m Curtis Curly-tail and I am here at Lyric Power Publishing to announce my latest video! But first, let me tell you how much I love roadrunner birds. Did you know when they leave tracks behind, you can’t tell what direction they came from or where they went? I wish I could do that! And roadrunners are really, really fast. That makes me a little frightened of them, too, because they do love their lizard snacks. We lizards are pretty fast, ourselves. So far, so good.

I hope you’ll come on over to my YouTube channel, Curtis Curly-tail Speaks, and watch my latest video about the Southwest’s iconic bird: the Roadrunner. I give lots of interesting facts about this cool bird.”

A copper colored book cover featuring an illustration of a Roadrunner bird
“With vibrant illustrations by Nicholas Thorpe, this picture book is jam-packed with scientific facts about roadrunners, delivered in verse form to keep the narrative lively. Roadrunners “…grab their victim/behind its head/And bash it on/the ground until it is dead.” Want to know how to swallow a horned lizard? Keep reading!” AZ Daily Star

 

And then, check out Elaine A. Powers book called Don’t Make Me Fly! The book tells all about this bird sacred to Native American peoples because of its courage and speed. It is written in fun rhymes and vividly illustrated. Don’t Make Me Fly! is available at Amazon.com.

A colorful illustration of a pair of roadrunners in a Southwestern Desert
An illustration by Nicholas Thorpe from Don’t Make Me Fly!
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We’re Proud to Announce the Publication of How to Eat Breakfast by Gene Twaronite

graphic image of a blue book cover with the heads of a little girl and animals on it

How DO all those animals eat?

Lyric Power Publishing LLC is proud to announce the publication of How to Eat Breakfast, written by Gene Twaronite and illustrated by Diane Ronning. This delightful book explores how and what different animals eat.

It all starts when Wanda’s mother sets down a plate of pancakes for Wanda and says,

“Now eat them while they’re still hot.”

But Wanda would not.

She just sat and stared at her feet

dreaming of other ways to eat.”

Come along on Wanda’s imaginary adventures, marvelously illustrated by Diane Ronning, while author Gene Twaronite makes the science of animal nutrition fun for the little ones!

LLP is delighted to have Gene and Diane join us.

Gene Twaronite is a Tucson poet, essayist, and children’s fiction writer. He is the author of nine books, including two juvenile fantasy novels, as well as collections of essays, short stories, and poems. His poetry book Trash Picker on Mars was the winner of the 2017 New Mexico-Arizona Book Award for Arizona poetry. Follow more of Gene’s writing at his website: thetwaronitezone.com.

Diane Ronning draws and paints while eating breakfast. She is an artist/illustrator, teacher, and author who creates fun activities for children. She Lives in Tucson, Arizona, where wild desert animals wander into her yard searching for food, so, who better to bring this charming story to life?

How to Eat Breakfast is available on Amazon, in both Kindle and print versions.

photo of a red green-iguana hanging upside down eating
Chile, who prefers to eat upside down, says to get your copy today!
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New Word: Geckolet by Elaine A. Powers, Author

Geckolet image courtesy of Wikipedia

As a sixty-something year old biologist, I am excited to learn new things. I believe in learning new things every day. Recently, while listening to a conference, I heard a word I wasn’t familiar with: Geckolet. I’m familiar with geckos, after all, I have two species (Native Western Banded Gecko and invasive Mediterranean House Gecko) that live around my house, but what is a geckolet?

Not only is the geckolet (Sphaerodactylus) smaller than other geckos, but they have round, instead of vertical, eye pupils. Some geckolets are tiny, less than an inch long from their snout to their vent. These are the smallest reptiles in the world, which means they’re interesting to me. You might be able to tell around here that I do love my reptile family!

They are the focus of a good number of my fun (rhyming and adventure tales) children’s science books. I hope you’ll take a look at books such as Tabby and Cleo: Unexpected Friends on my Books Page.

A bright green children's book cover, showing a Five-Fingered Fairy riding a Bahamian Boa

A Magical Chapter Book about
Tabby, the Five-Finger Fairy and Her
Adventures with Cleo, a Bahamian Boa

Reading Level: Ages 8+

52 Pages

Tabby Comes Alive in
Illustrations by Nick Thorpe

Tabby, the Five-Finger Fairy, who comes from the Five-Finger Tree, Tabebuia bahamensis, loves the native plants, animals and people of The Bahamas. She makes friends wherever she goes!

When Tabby is attacked and almost eaten by a rat, a Bahamian Boa comes to her rescue. But she has seen so much fear of  the boas, Tabby is afraid. The boa, Cleo, gently introduces herself and she and Tabby become friends.

After witnessing many attacks on Cleo, Tabby decides to help her find a new home. They go to Mama Hope’s Garden, and Mama Hope teaches her grandson, Scottie, and her neighbors about boas. They are not venomous and they are responsible for killing rats that would otherwise overrun the islands.

Along the way, Tabby helps animals they meet to realize their foolish animosity toward each other and she helps them to, instead, become friends–like she and Cleo did.

Mama Hope realizes the only safe place for Cleo is at Retreat Gardens. They take Cleo there and Mama Hope’s grandson can finally see the Tabby, the fairy.

“Science is important and needs to be studied,” Tabby tells Scottie, “but there are some things you need to believe in your heart to see.”

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May I Have Some Privacy Please? by Elaine A. Powers, Author

roadrunner in sonoran desert wings spread

GREATER ROADRUNNER

I’m always trying to get an interesting view of the animals and plants I write about in my books and blog post. Roadrunners move very quickly, so I was having trouble getting a good photo. Then I came across this roadie at the Sabino Canyon Visitors Center near Tucson, Az. The roadie was hurrying along the sidewalk when I joined the bird.  Roadie tucked behind some rocks and an agave cactus, but I was still in sight.

Finally, the roadie decided it was safe behind a grouping of boulders and a large prickly pear cactus. Conveniently, the cactus left a window where I could observe the roadie as it spread its wings to expose its dark back to bask in the sun. I was honored by this opportunity to observe and share the bird’s behavior. I think the roadie got nice and warm.

You can read about this behavior and many others in the rhyming book I wrote, Don’t Make Me Fly!

A copper colored book cover featuring an illustration of a Roadrunner bird
“With vibrant illustrations by Nicholas Thorpe, this picture book is jam-packed with scientific facts about roadrunners, delivered in verse form to keep the narrative lively. Roadrunners “…grab their victim/behind its head/And bash it on/the ground until it is dead.” Want to know how to swallow a horned lizard? Keep reading!” AZ Daily Star