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Science Vs. Poetry? Why not Science THROUGH Poetry? By Elaine A. Powers, Author

One of our core tenets at Lyric Power Publishing is that science education can be enhanced by using rhyme. The flow and meter of the verses attract and hold the attention of the reader. If the reader is engaged, they hear and absorb the scientific information being offered. Several LLP authors are using poetry to teach science. After all, science should be fun!

Recently, in a poetry critique meeting, one of the participants made interesting comments. He felt that the science slowed down the poetry I had submitted for review, and that the scientific facts should be alluded to, not elucidated. The poem describing ants was unnecessarily factual, he said.

I was surprised. The purpose of LPP’s rhyming picture books, such as the Don’t series, is the presentation of scientific facts. We call this type of rhyming applied poetry. The purpose of applied poetry here is to elucidate scientific facts.

Poetry can be used for a multitude of purposes: to stimulate emotion, to create mental images, and to document history—all very valid. Also valid is using poetry to clarify science, creating a work that is both entertaining and educational. We receive fan mail from parents about their young children reciting or singing stanzas from the Don’t series books, leading us to believe we are onto something here! After all, science should be fun! Just ask Myrtle (the Tortoise) pictured here, who asked me to write Don’t Call Me Turtle! She loves the rhymes as much as the kids do—just as long as no one calls her turtle! That’s what her book is all about—the differences between turtles and tortoises and there are many! You can hear it read by clicking here.

And here is a book review of another science-based, rhyming, picture book by Helen Woodhams that appeared in the Arizona Daily Star:

Review by Helen Woodhams of Don’t Make Me Fly in the Arizona Daily Star:
“What a curious creature the roadrunner is! This iconic desert bird prefers hoofing it to flying, and its footprints are the same backwards as they are forwards. With vibrant illustrations by Nicholas Thorpe, this picture book is jam-packed with scientific facts about roadrunners, delivered in verse form to keep the narrative lively. Roadrunners “…grab their victim/behind its head/And bash it on/the ground until it is dead.” Want to know how to swallow a horned lizard? Keep reading! This is the second offering in the “Don’t” series by Tucson author Elaine A. Powers. The first is “Don’t Call Me Turtle!” “Don’t Make Me Fly!” is recommended for children in grades K-4.”

 

A copper colored book cover featuring an illustration of a Roadrunner bird
“With vibrant illustrations by Nicholas Thorpe, this picture book is jam-packed with scientific facts about roadrunners, delivered in verse form to keep the narrative lively. Roadrunners “…grab their victim/behind its head/And bash it on/the ground until it is dead.” Want to know how to swallow a horned lizard? Keep reading!” AZ Daily Star
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Tails, Tales, Adventures, Oh, My!

Gallery of Books

Welcome to Lyric Power Publishing, LLC, where we believe science books should be both educational and entertaining. Our children’s books illustrations are unusual in the marketplace: They are vivid—to attract the reader to both the written word and the fascinating world of science. Science is interesting and fun when presented in delightful rhymes or engaging adventures. No dry textbooks here! But don’t think these stories are only for children. Our fan mail indicates adults enjoy them equally and have also gained new knowledge while reading them.

We have recently added books for adult readers at LPP, though they could be enjoyed by some older children. Silent Rocks by Elaine A. Powers falls in our Conservation Category and is about how to help save the endangered Rock Iguanas of Cayman Brac.  Queen of the Night: the Night-Blooming Cereus, also by Elaine A. Powers, is found in our Plants Category and is about the mysterious Sonoran Desert plant that blooms one night every summer–all of them at the same time! Brown Booby Birds of Cayman Brac by Bonnie Scott is filed in our Birds Category and is about the last forty pairs of these large sea birds that are found only on the island of Cayman Brac. Time and the Garden by Jo Busha is also in Plants and is a book of essays from her life and experiences in the garden. Please check them out by clicking on the titles.

We may be a small publisher, but we have a mighty mission:  Science education should not be boring! To that end, in addition to our fun, science-based books in print, we have developed our own activity sheets and bundled them into 12 to 47-page study-units. Our affordable, printable activity sheets, workbooks, flannel-boards and standups for Grades K-5 provide creative and fun opportunities to learn about ecology, reptiles, birds, mammals, habitats, predators and prey, plants, rocks, maps and directions. They include coloring pages and lessons on anatomy, life-cycles, crossword puzzles, cut-and-paste, word searches, spelling, vocabulary, math, and story-writing, and more. Wouldn’t your children rather count iguanas or bats than apples and oranges? Our workbooks can be viewed at the Workbooks tab and are downloaded by you to be printed and used as many times as you’d like.

We hope you will enjoy all there is to see on the Lyric Power Publishing, LLC website. You can meet our authors and illustrators under the Home tab and see all our books at the Our Books tab.

Thank you for joining us as we discuss our work and our insights on this blog, Tails, Tales, Adventures, Oh, My! If you’d like to receive updates in your email, use the subscription box in the right column of any page but the Home page. If you have any questions or comments, please contact us at iginspired@gmail.com.

 

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What Kind of Non-Fiction Do We Write at Lyric Power Publishing?

infographic for Queen of the Night the Night-Blooming Cereus Queen of the Night is available at Amazon.com. We at Lyric Power Publishing LLC are delighted to write science-based children’s books–and a few for adults, too. The scientific information is accurate, but it is presented in entertaining ways, hopefully making learning more accessible. Poetry and adventure tales are used to present the science and they’re fun! We’ve been asked if the books are non-fiction. Not technically, because a story-line is used instead of real animals. But as this definition is debated, Melissa Stewart wrote about the new kinds of non-fiction children’s books.As nonfiction book sales to schools and libraries slumped, authors began searching for ways to add value to their work, so they could compete with the Internet. The result has been a new breed of finely crafted expository literature that delights as well as informs. Unlike traditional nonfiction, expository literature presents narrowly focused topics, such as STEM concepts and processes, in creative ways that reflect the author’s passion for the subject. These books typically feature an innovative format and carefully chosen text structure, a strong voice, and rich, engaging language.” After reading Stewart’s descriptions, the books published by Lyric Power Publishing LLC fit best in the category of Expository Literature. They are innovative, have a strong voice, and engaging language. Along with science, these books can include local culture and vibrant illustrations. In addition, the workbooks and activity sheets published at LPP enhance the STEM education goals, as well as providing language and geographical information. Come explore a new kind of non-fiction—check out Lyric Power Publishing’s books and workbooks.
an infographic of complete information about the book Don't Make Me Fly
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What Kind of Non-Fiction Do We Write at Lyric Power Publishing?

infographic for Queen of the Night the Night-Blooming CereusQueen of the Night is available at Amazon.com. We at Lyric Power Publishing LLC are delighted to write science-based children’s books–and a few for adults, too. The scientific information is accurate, but it is presented in entertaining ways, hopefully making learning more accessible. Poetry and adventure tales are used to present the science and they’re fun! We’ve been asked if the books are non-fiction. Not technically, because a story-line is used instead of real animals. But as this definition is debated, Melissa Stewart wrote about the new kinds of non-fiction children’s books. As nonfiction book sales to schools and libraries slumped, authors began searching for ways to add value to their work, so they could compete with the Internet. The result has been a new breed of finely crafted expository literature that delights as well as informs. Unlike traditional nonfiction, expository literature presents narrowly focused topics, such as STEM concepts and processes, in creative ways that reflect the author’s passion for the subject. These books typically feature an innovative format and carefully chosen text structure, a strong voice, and rich, engaging language. After reading Stewart’s descriptions, the books published by Lyric Power Publishing LLC fit best in the category of Expository Literature. They are innovative, have a strong voice, and engaging language. Along with science, these books can include local culture and vibrant illustrations. In addition, the workbooks and activity sheets published at LPP enhance the STEM education goals, as well as providing language and geographical information. Come explore a new kind of non-fiction—check out Lyric Power Publishing’s books and workbooks. an infographic about the book Don't Make Me Fly
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When Pets Become Pests by Elaine A. Powers, Author

a photo of the head of a red tegu large lizard

You might have seen the news lately about an aggressive giant lizard invading Georgia. For conservationists in Florida, this wasn’t surprising. They have been fighting this invasive lizard for years. When people hear the name of this large lizard, they ask the same question I am asked when I talk about the reptiles I live with: What is a Tegu?

A tegu is a large lizard from South America. I describe them as a linebacker lizard because the males don’t have a neck that shows. Massive jowls extend down to the shoulders. Tegus are omnivores and intelligent. They are docile and can be housebroken, making them popular pets.

The species of tegu in the news as an invasive is the Argentinian Black and White Tegu, Salvator merianae. I had one when I lived in New Jersey. I named him Rory, short for Rorschach, because his color pattern reminded me of the ink-spot test. I donated Rory to an educational program where he was very popular. He would welcome each child as he or she came into the room.

Sadly, when these tegus were released into Florida, their aggressive appetites were revealed. Tegus will eat anything they can swallow. They have very large mouths. They are also very hardy, able to withstand the colder temperatures as they have moved north. They are significantly damaging ecosystems as an invasive species.

I currently have a Red Tegu, Salvator rufescens. He is named Rascal because it took him only eight minutes to escape from his first enclosure, one that had been reinforced to prevent him from doing just that. Not only is his color glorious, but he is also quite cuddly. I would let him free roam, but I keep finding him with Trevor Box Turtle in his mouth!

Tegus in North America should be kept only as beloved family members and not roaming free outside, damaging the environment. Interested in reptiles? At Lyric Power Publishing, LLC, we focus on fun, science-based books and workbooks. Check them out!  

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No School? Stir-Crazy Kids? Serve Up Some Fun Science!

infographic about fun science education activity sheets and workbooksServe Up Some Fun Science at Home!

The mission of Lyric Power Publishing LLC is to “Make Science Fun!” That’s because we know how fun science really is.

Our Activity Sheets and Workbooks are for Ages K-5 (see workbook covers for grade level and contents) and while they are highly educational, they are also lots of fun! Have you ever counted iguanas? Or made a lizard clock? Made your own Compass Rose or Passport?

Purchase a Download Once and Print as Many Times as You’d Like!

Depending on the grade, workbooks can include: Animal Facts, Name the Animal, Lifecycles, Compare Traits, Food Chains, Label the Parts, Color by Math, Mean/Median/Mode/Range, Color by Number, Printing, Underline the Answer, Counting, Convert Grams to Pounds, Fill in the Blanks, True or False, Cut Along the Dotted Lines, Cut and Paste, Cut and Classify, Fill in the Right Word, Word Search, Match the Facts, Using a Histogram, Venn Diagrams, Making Charts, Interpreting Charts, Crossword Puzzle, Other Puzzles, Conservation, Vocabulary, Complete the Sentence, Unscramble the Sentences, Prepositions of Place, Using Maps, Writing Prompts, Essay Writing Exercise, Reading Comprehension, and More!

Who makes all that fun, economically? We do—Lyric Power Publishing!
Purchase a Download Once and Print as Many Times as You’d Like!

For additional relaxing fun, check out our Coloring Books and Flannel Board Templates, enjoyed by children and adults alike. Coloring is handwork and creative, proven to reduce stress. Let your creativity run wild! Get out your colored pencils or crayons and have some fun today! Then print the pages again and color them in a whole new assortment!

You’re welcome!

 

A seafoam green book cover about seaturtles, with an image of a Green Sea Turtle
A Workbook of 29 Pages for Grades PreK-1
A light blue and white book cover with an image of multi-colored river rocks
One of our Workbooks of 43 Pages for Grades 2-5
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Author Elaine A. Powers Will Be Signing Books at the Tucson Festival of Books, March 14-15, 2020

map of children's area at TFOB

author Elaine A Powers holds a book in front of her booth at Tucson Festival of Books
Come out and say Hello on March 14-15!

On March 14-15, 2020, Tucson will host the third largest book festival in the US, the Tucson Festival of Books. Over 130,000 people come to enjoy this world-of-books every year.

All aspects of the book business are included, with several hundred authors in attendance, many who are involved in panels open to the public. Special programs for children and teens and about science are presented. This event is known for its cultural diversity and promoting literacy among children and adults in Southern Arizona. Millions of dollars have been donated to literacy programs because of this focus.

Author Elaine A. Powers participates in this event by having a booth from which she sells her books. Book lovers enjoy buying books directly from authors and Ms. Powers loves meeting them, as well, and personalizing and signing the books. She says it’s one of the most rewarding parts of being an author.

Ms. Powers will share the booth with author and illustrator, Anderson Atlas. Together, they offer books for all children’s book age groups, and some for adult readers, too.

Stop by and say hello on the weekend of March 14-15.

Tucson Festival of Books
March 14-15, 2020   9:30 – 5:30
University of Arizona
Children’s Section
Booth 324
Grab an Adventure by the Tail
Elaine A. Powers, Author
Anderson Atlas, Author/Illustrator
BOOKS FOR ALL AGES OF CHILDREN

 

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Lyric Power Publishing is Proud to Announce a New Book: Time and the Garden By Jo Busha

a book cover with a photo of a lush, Vermont garden

Jo Busha, author of Time and the Garden: A Book of Essays,  starting gardening in 1975, when she met and married her husband and they moved to the Randolph, Vermont, the property where they still live. She was born in Brattleboro, Vermont, and grew up in Indiana. After earning a BA in International Affairs from George Washington University, she returned to Vermont to teach high school social studies. After their twin sons were born, she went back to school to get her MS in Human Nutrition and Foods from the University of Vermont. Busha worked for the Child Nutrition Programs at the Vermont Department of Education for 23 years. Since retiring, she spends most of her time working in her garden or planning her next steps in the garden, and writing about gardening and country living in Vermont.

photo of author Jo Busha in a chair in front of a window
Author Jo Busha at home in Vermont

Lyric Power Publishing, LLC is proud to announce the publication of a new book, a collection of essays by author Jo Busha, on life, gardening and the natural world, called Time and the Garden.  Jo’s collection of essays (written over a ten-year period about gardening, life in Vermont, and her observations of the natural world) is not a how-to book, but gardeners may find the essays instructive. It is arranged by season, but not all the essays have a specific seasonal connection. In addition to gardeners, Time and the Garden will appeal to readers seeking a strong sense of place and people interested in rural living, even if they aren’t able to live it. This place, where Busha has lived for 45 years, has played a huge role in her life. Book lovers are likely to feel this a cozy read, warmth for a snowy day.

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Lyric Power Publishing, LLC is Expanding! We Are Adding Books for Adult Readers, Too!

close up photo of sunflower head

Lyric Power Publishing, LLC, is very excited to announce that we are expanding and adding books for adult readers, also.

While many of the existing books written for children are enjoyed by their parents and grandparents, too, we will soon be adding books for adult readers that have to do with the planet, nature, animals and the natural sciences.

Please check back for the coming new offerings!

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New Book Smell by Elaine A. Powers, Author

photo of book with cracked pagesI was at a book meeting this morning when a friend of mine took the new book she had just purchased, opened it to the middle, stuck her nose into the crack and inhaled deeply.  A look of contentment covered her face and radiated through her body.

“Ah . . . the new book smell,” she uttered.

I confess to being unfamiliar with the smell of a new book.  We, of a certain age, remember the smell of mimeograph sheets, but that’s very different. So, of course, I had to try. I picked up one of my books that hadn’t been opened. I pulled the pages apart and smelled deeply of the fresh ink smell (mine was a picture book).

Hmmm, what a delicious smell! I hate to think of the many opportunities I have missed by not smelling my new books. I will not make that mistake in the future.

Even though e-books are convenient, they don’t have that new book smell. Oh, wait! Maybe we could create a fragrance “new book smell” that you could sniff when you turn on your reader! (There’s the lab biologist in me coming out!)

The most important thing, though, is to read, whether the book is electronic, well worn, or being opened for the first time. READ and increase your vocabulary, knowledge base, reduce your stress and enjoy good stories!

But feel free to sniff, as well.

There are lots of fun, science-based books to read at my Author Page on Amazon. Not only do they smell great, they’ll help you learn about turtles and tortoises and lizards and snakes and birds and plants!

infographic about "Don't" series books