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Cantata Sulcata! Video with Curtis Curly-tail Lizard

Ladies and Gentlemen, Boys and Girls, and a special Hello to all my Fans!

It’s ME! Curtis Curly-tail Lizard–the only lizard with his own Blog and YouTube Channel!

Does that make me special? It sure does!

I just LOVE my work! I have the best job in the whole world!

Today, I’d like to introduce you to a friend of mine, Cantata Sulcata! Please click on the image below to learn all about Cantata and other Sulcata Tortoises.

Have a great day!

image of a curly-tail lizard pointing to a cell phone showing  a picture of a Sulcata tortoise
Click on our picture and come and learn all about Sulcata Tortoises.
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How Many Eyes Does An Iguana Have? by Elaine A. Powers, Author

photo of third eye of rhini iguana

When giving talks to people about reptiles, a question is asked of the audience: How many eyes do iguanas have? The majority quickly respond “two.” An obvious choice. However, when asked if there are other answers, a tentative “four” is offered? People then look uncertain. The correct answer is three!

The third eye is located on the top of the iguana’s head is and is call the Parietal Eye.  It doesn’t have an eyelid nor is it able to focus but it responds to changes in light and can detect movement.

photo of third eye of green iguana

People have on these “third eyes” as well, but the skull is in the way. It’s called the Pineal Gland. The iguana’s third eye helps with Circadian Rhythm and danger from above. It’s helpful to have a warning when a hawk or snake is coming down. Everything eats an iguana.

The next time you are fortunate enough to be near iguanas, or other lizards, look at the top of their heads. You might see an interesting dome.  Now, you’ll know it’s the very handy “third” eye.

For more information about iguanas, check out the iguana workbook, My Unit Study on Iguanas. LOTS of fun, educational activities in this 30-page workbook.

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For Some of Us, Research is Fun! by Elaine A. Powers, Author

Book cover for the Night-Blooming Cereus

One aspect of writing science-based books is doing research, which is perfect for me because I’ve always loved reading about different subjects.  As a child, I read the encyclopedia. I wonder sometimes if younger people know the joy of pulling out one of the many books in a set of encyclopedias and flipping through those pages packed with information? When I needed details, I would go to the reference section of my local library and search through the many pages in the reference section.

book cover for Hickatee Turtles
The Cayman Islands have turtles that live both on land and in the sea. Hickatee lives on land and doesn’t belong in the sea, like the sea turtles. Do you know the differences? Come inside and learn about turtles, especially the marvelous Hickatee.

Nowadays, we merely search the Internet. My projects cause me to search for many subjects, such as the Night-Blooming Cereus and the Hickatee Turtle. I type in words that might lead to the desired topic, then branch out depending on the results. It’s truly amazing, the information you can find on the World Wide Web. I learn all sort of things. I find details about the animals and plants I am writing about, along with photographs. That way I can guide my illustrators.

It’s easy to spend hours following one line of investigation to another, but I don’t consider it time wasted. Any time you can learn new information is time well spent. I searched “time well spent” and this is what the Internet says: “Time well spent” is any time that brought you fulfillment, comfort and satisfaction, energizing you for your life goals (writing books, for me) with enthusiasm and drive.”

I hope this is as true for you as it is for me.

For some fun “time well spent,” please see our interesting and inexpensive workbooks chock full of fun activities and coloring pages.

book cover Greater Roadrunner grades 2-4

book cover my book about rocks

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April 3 National Find a Rainbow Day by Author Elaine A. Powers

photo of a rainbow in so. Az

Science is so interesting! And though I love to make all science fun–rainbows are just plain old fun to start with!

Kermit the Frog sang the question, “Why are there so many songs about rainbows and what’s on the other side?” Judy Garland is famous for singing “Somewhere over the Rainbow,” although I enjoy Israel Kamakawiwo’ole’s version even more.  So, why are there so many songs about rainbows? Why does seeing a rainbow bring joy and hope to people?

After all, a rainbow is just the light spectrum in the shape of an arc. The colors are revealed in the opposite direction of the sun when light is refracted within a droplet of water, then reflected on the back of the droplet and refracted once again when exiting the droplet. But did you know that all rainbows are in fact circles?  Why do we not see them that way?  The rainbow’s true structure runs into the ground or horizon.

You may also have been told that there are seven colors to a rainbow: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet. In fact, there are almost a million colors in the rainbow. These are just the big ones in our visible spectrum range.

Sometimes, you may see more than one rainbow—multiples can occur. When light gets reflected twice inside the water droplets, a second fainter rainbow appears above the main one. Look closely and you’ll see that the colors are reversed!  Now the red line is at the bottom and violet is on top.

So, why are there so many songs about rainbows? Because they are so interesting! You can celebrate this day by creating your own rainbow using a garden hose or a prism. Or sing one of those rainbow songs linked above!

And, since we’re at homebound mostly now, enjoy more fun science! Check out my books at Lyric Power Publishing and ElaineAPowers.com.

infographic of books by category

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No School? Stir-Crazy Kids? Serve Up Some Fun Science!

infographic about fun science education activity sheets and workbooksServe Up Some Fun Science at Home!

The mission of Lyric Power Publishing LLC is to “Make Science Fun!” That’s because we know how fun science really is.

Our Activity Sheets and Workbooks are for Ages K-5 (see workbook covers for grade level and contents) and while they are highly educational, they are also lots of fun! Have you ever counted iguanas? Or made a lizard clock? Made your own Compass Rose or Passport?

Purchase a Download Once and Print as Many Times as You’d Like!

Depending on the grade, workbooks can include: Animal Facts, Name the Animal, Lifecycles, Compare Traits, Food Chains, Label the Parts, Color by Math, Mean/Median/Mode/Range, Color by Number, Printing, Underline the Answer, Counting, Convert Grams to Pounds, Fill in the Blanks, True or False, Cut Along the Dotted Lines, Cut and Paste, Cut and Classify, Fill in the Right Word, Word Search, Match the Facts, Using a Histogram, Venn Diagrams, Making Charts, Interpreting Charts, Crossword Puzzle, Other Puzzles, Conservation, Vocabulary, Complete the Sentence, Unscramble the Sentences, Prepositions of Place, Using Maps, Writing Prompts, Essay Writing Exercise, Reading Comprehension, and More!

Who makes all that fun, economically? We do—Lyric Power Publishing!
Purchase a Download Once and Print as Many Times as You’d Like!

For additional relaxing fun, check out our Coloring Books and Flannel Board Templates, enjoyed by children and adults alike. Coloring is handwork and creative, proven to reduce stress. Let your creativity run wild! Get out your colored pencils or crayons and have some fun today! Then print the pages again and color them in a whole new assortment!

You’re welcome!

 

A seafoam green book cover about seaturtles, with an image of a Green Sea Turtle
A Workbook of 29 Pages for Grades PreK-1
A light blue and white book cover with an image of multi-colored river rocks
One of our Workbooks of 43 Pages for Grades 2-5
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Happy New Year! Happy New Decade! By Elaine A. Powers, Author

infographic of Elaine Powers with large hybrid iguanaWith the start of the New Year, we tend to establish goals for our productivity, and things we’d like to change or improve.  According to the Gregorian calendar, January 1, 2020 starts a new decade. My goals for the new year and new decade are to dedicate my efforts to both furthering science education (in a fun and entertaining way, of course!), as well as increasing awareness of conservation. I enjoy sharing science with others, whether it be through my books or taking my reptiles into schools and other places.

If you live in a cold climate, may I suggest while inside, where it’s warm and comfy, reading a few of our books or completing the activities and coloring pages in the workbooks? Check them out here and at elaineapowers.com. If you’re in a warmer climate, I encourage you to take a walk outside and then finish the day with reading one of our colorful and rhyming books to a young one, or whipping out the crayons and markers to color and complete one of our interesting workbooks.

One of our goals in 2020 is to add the national education standard codes to the wonderful workbooks created for Lyric Power Publishing by Marilyn Buehrer. Our workbooks are comprehensive, interesting and fun, but they aren’t labeled with the standards, which home-schooling parents and teachers need to know.

If there are other ways that Lyric Power Publishing, LLC, can assist you in meeting your educational needs, please contact me at iginspired@gmail.com.

I can tell already that 2020 is going to be an exciting year.  There will be more books, more talks, more videos, and many more posts at the blog. Please follow along as life unfolds with my multitude of reptiles, one horse, and an occasional visiting dog, on this merry journey of mine.

May 2020 be a happy, healthy, fun, and educational year for you and yours!

 

 

infographic about "Don't" series books

a light green and dark green book cover with the image of a duck in water

a yellow and green book cover with an image of a desert tortoise

a yellow and green book cover with an image of a fruit bat and a common rat

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Are Racer Snakes Increasing as Invasive Green Iguanas Have? by Elaine A. Powers, Author

Cayman Racer snake on cement
Cayman Racer snake image courtesy of www.thecaymanislands.ky

I like to write about topics to educate or share an interest of mine.  In today’s installment, I want to pose a question, one to which we may never know the answer.  As part of native iguana conservation, a great deal of effort is currently spent eradicating invasive green iguanas.  Green iguanas have been introduced, either accidentally or intentionally, in many places where they didn’t live.  As a result, these lizards become pests, destroying the vegetation, out competing the native animals for resources, and even eliminating species through hybridization.

One such place is the island of Grand Cayman. Grand is the largest of the three islands that make up the country of the Cayman Islands, located south of Cuba in the Caribbean Sea.  It is about 76 square miles in size.  Green iguanas found Grand to be paradise and soon their population increased to 1.5 million invasive lizards on this island. If you do the math, that comes out to 20,000 green iguanas per square mile! There are only 53,000 people in that same area.

The removal of the iguanas is the topic of other posts here, but a question came up during the discussion of the invasive lizards the other day.  On Grand Cayman, there are native predators of iguanas and other lizards, which include the endemic Cayman Racer (Alsophis cantherigerus caymanus). These snakes can grow to over four feet but are usually smaller. Fortunately, these snakes have been shown to enjoy the invasive iguanas in addition to their native lizard prey.

The question that arose is: With the increase in the number of prey lizards, did the population of racers increase as well?  And if they did, how will removing the excess invasive iguanas affect the snake population? Unfortunately, racers are killed by people’s pets, their dogs and cats, like many other animals, but maybe the extra green-iguana food helped increased their numbers in spite of this. An interesting question, don’t you think? And what will happen to their populations when the invasives are under control? Will the snake numbers dwindle?

We may never know, but situations like this remind us of the impact we humans have on ecosystems. We introduce indiscriminate predators with our pets, we introduce invasive species that affect ecosystems, and we destroy habitats with our buildings. We need to be aware of what we are doing and pay attention to how we affect the natural homes and environments of the animals that called all of these places home before we did.

Is the cold weather keeping you indoors? Children will enjoy continuing their education by working the activity sheets and coloring pages in our fun, comprehensive and interesting supplemental workbooks, such as these pictured below.

a white and light blue book cover with an image of an iguana's head

A book cover, dotted background, orange letters My Book About Rattlesnakes of the United States, with a list of all rattlers

a blue and turquoise book cover with an image of Cayman Islands passport cover

A light blue and white book cover with an image of multi-colored river rocks
The Rock Cycle cut and paste project in this lesson comes from this workbook. It also includes work pages on rock collecting.

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On Black Friday, Give the Gift that Lasts a Lifetime by Elaine A. Powers, Author

graphic, white with black shopping bag and the words "black Friday"
Image Courtesy of ElisaRiva from Pixabay

As we scurry into the holiday shopping season, don’t forget about giving a gift that lasts a lifetime–the gift of knowledge. Whether you’re shopping for a toddler or an adult, the books from Lyric Power Publishing, LLC provide education in an entertaining way. We’re never too young or too old to learn correct scientific information, and learning sticks when it’s fun.

A brown book cover, with a circle with blue sky, with a rattlesnake popping out of the circle, title: Don't Make Me Rattle* For All Ages
* Purpose: Rattlesnake Education Dispels Fear
* Education: 25 facts and traits of the rattlesnake written in rhyme are easy to remember
* Art: Vibrant illustrations highlight the parts and habitat of the rattlesnake
* Gift: A perfect birthday or holiday gift for those who love snakes and for education

Do you or your little ones love rhyming words? Do you have a child who loves adventure tales? Do you have a budding ecologist?  You’ll find all that and more in our science-based books, loved by parents, kids and their teachers. And it’s easy to order online at LPP. Just click on Our Books.

a book cover of a nature preserve, where seeds are cultivated. Seeds are drawn as cute characters
A Lyric Power Publishing book about seeds longing for a home. Yes, all of life longs to find its own special place to belong.

Perhaps you like to give your children or grandchildren coloring books or fun worksheets that supplement education at home. LLP has wonderful, comprehensive workbooks, too.

A light blue book cover with images of freshwater turtle and green sea turtle

38 pages of fun, educational activity sheets and coloring pages!

Most importantly, we at Lyric Power Publishing wish everyone a safe, happy, and healthy holiday season!

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Claiming Who I Am by Elaine A. Powers, Author

A collage of 12 colorful children's book coversLyric Power Publishing represents three authors at this time, though my books make up the largest quantity of LPP’s published works. Perhaps the parents and grandparents reading this will consider giving one or two of our wonderful children’s books (that are enjoyed by adults, too) this Christmas. With these books, kids learn that science is fun!~~EAP

I recently traveled to a foreign country (a pretty common event for me).  On the immigration form, countries often ask for your profession. During my life’s work, I put biologist. I was a laboratory researcher. On one trip to Africa, I think that admission got me thoroughly searched. Upon my return, I declared I had purchased some sine wood carvings. Every item and the suitcases themselves were thoroughly searched. They suspected I had brought back some illegal samples of something. Nope, just a few nice carvings done by a local craftsman.

After I took early retirement, I put down “retired” as my profession, even though I was actively writing and trying to build my book business.

The author Elaine A. Powers head shot against a green background
(Made by the author’s proud website staff for her. She is also a wonderful employer.)

So, for the first time, on this last trip, I put down “Author” as my profession. I don’t know why it’s been so hard for me to consider myself a professional writer. I have always loved science, and I recently realized that the enjoyment I get from writing and sharing about science has made my book business into a real business. I really, truly am an author.

Come join me in my adventure. Share your thoughts with me in a comment below and on Facebook here and here and here. Read my books that weave science into poetry and adventure tales, making science fun. Science should be fun! Check out Lyric Power Publishing’s workbooks, which tie into LPP’s books, and are so well made by a teacher’s teacher. We are very proud of them here. They are extensive, multi-subject with a focus–like iguanas! We say, “Why not do math counting iguanas?

a white and light blue book cover with an image of an iguana's headFor educators and homeschooling parents, LPP offers a 30-page workbook called My Unit Study on Iguanas designed for students in grades 2-4. It’s filled with fun and educational pages and puzzles, all about the iguana.

a light brown book cover with green lettering: Queen of the Night: Night Blooming Cereus, with illustration of a white flower
Biologist and Author Elaine A. Powers includes both scientific facts and the magic of this Southwestern Desert plant in her book, QUEEN OF THE NIGHT: THE NIGHT-BLOOMING CEREUS. Powers says being a musician helped her to weave into poetry the plant parts, the blooming cycle, the plant’s growing conditions, and its pollinators. This wonderful book about a very special plant in the Sonoran Desert is for all ages.

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It’s National Parents as Teachers Day and National STEM/STEAM Day

boy and mother with book on table about turtlesEveryone knows that parents are their child’s first teachers. From teaching them how to say mommy or daddy, to counting on their toes, to learning how to walk, parents are the most important teachers of children. As kids grow into adults, they still look to their parents for guidance. On November 8, we’re celebrating that relationship.

While parents are teaching their children, they should include science.  After all, November 8 is also National STEM/STEAM Day. Don’t know what those letters stand for? STEM stands for Science Technology Engineering Math. Education in these four areas is critical for the future. STEAM includes the equally important Arts, including humanities, language arts, dance, drama, music, visual arts, design and new media.

At Lyric Power Publishing, LLC, we encourage both kinds of learning, investigative and creative, and we like to make learning fun! Check out our books here and our workbooks here, and enjoy learning about science!

A light blue book cover with images of freshwater turtle and green sea turtle

38 Pages of Turtle Facts, Traits, Diet, Survival, Label the Parts, True or False, Cut and Paste, Reading Comprehension, Color by Math, Write the Differences, Vocabulary, Word Definitions, Cause and Effect and More!