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Tabby the Five-Finger Fairy–A Star is Born! by Curtis Curly-tail

 

Image Tabby Five finer fairy You Tube
Now on You Tube!
Tabby, the Five-Finger Fairy, who comes from the Five-Finger Tree, Tabebuia bahamensis, loves the native plants, animals and people of The Bahamas. She makes friends wherever she goes!

I like to think of author Elaine A. Powers’s You Tube channel as MY channel. It does, after all, say at the top of the page, “Curtis Curly-tail Speaks!”

 

a curly tail lizard on a bahamian beach with blue sky and ocean, sand and green plants
Curtis Curly-tail Speaks on You Tube

But, I’m like, “Whoo, hoo! Look at that girl go!” I mean, have you seen and heard Tabby the Five-Finger Fairy on You Tube?

I’d read her books, of course–but I think I’m in love! Click the picture and see for yourself!

And remember, I’m here in The Bahamas with Tabby and you’re really far away! While I’m working on the girl, please check out her new video–and her books so important for The Bahamas!

Thanks from all your Bahamian Friends!

A children's book cover, brown background, orange and yellow lettering, with images of snakes from the Bahamas Tabby, the Five-Finger Fairy, introduces the fascinating, colorful Bahamian boas. Learn about the natural history of these native, but often misunderstood, snakes.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1797649396/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i4A bright green children's book cover, showing a Five-Fingered Fairy riding a Bahamian Boa Tabby, the Five-Finger Fairy, who comes from the Five-Finger Tree, Tabebuia bahamensis,
loves the native plants, animals and people of The Bahamas. She makes friends wherever she goes!

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The Right Words Make All the Difference by Elaine A. Powers, Author

a woman stands by a caution sign for iguanas in the road
Tanja shows the ineffective signs
Iguana conservationists were excited when road signs where put up on the Sisters Islands of the Cayman Islands, reminding drivers to slow down to protect the endemic iguanas, which unfortunately, enjoy the warmth of the roads and bask on them. Given enough warning, which happens when cars approach at the speed limit, the large lizards can get off the road.  Many iguanas have lost their tails to car tires, but they did survive. Unfortunately, far too many drivers don’t care if they hit an iguana or two as they drive along. They could be speeding, looking at their cell phones, or sadly, some aim for the lizards. Residents hoped the signs would help save lives. Despite the signs, iguanas continued to die on the roads of Cayman Brac and Little Cayman. What was needed? Additional signs were put up. School children were educated in the hopes that concern would spread within families. Then someone had an idea: Maybe the folks on the islands didn’t realize how unique these lizards are because they see them day in and day out. So, the signs were redesigned. The new signs emphasize that the Sister Isle Rock Iguana is an endangered species. They were installed along with the powerful hope that this news will get people’s attention. Another proposal was suggested that I really liked: Have the islands’ children design warning signs that are then installed along the roads. People would be delighted to see their relatives’ work and slow down to look at them. Education and responsibility are needed to help SIRIs survive in the only places they live on this earth. Humans can harm or help, and it is hoped drivers on the islands will slow down, even stop, for these special and endangered large lizards.
A woman and man stand near a Give Way to Iguanas sign
Tanja and Greg show off the new “Give Way to Rock Iguanas” sign

Why not count/sort/puzzle over iguanas, instead of apples? Big lizards are very interesting and a lot of fun to color! This inexpensive, yet wonderfully designed 30-page workbook is chock full of fun and educational activities. Get yours today!

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Oxidative Stress Happens to All Animals by Elaine A. Powers, Author

a green colored iguana lying on a tree branchToday we hear about oxidative stress and anti-oxidants. One of the parameters measured on animals in field research is oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species are quantified, or measured. Do you know what these terms mean and why they are so important?

As we learned in science class, atoms such as oxygen are made up of a nucleus with protons and neutrons, with electrons spinning around it. But oxygens don’t keep tight control of their electrons and they tend to bind to other atoms. Free radicals are oxygen-containing molecules with an uneven number of electrons.  This uneven number allows them to easily react with other molecules. These reactions are called oxidation.

Oxidation is a normal process in bodily functions. Free radicals help fight off pathogens which cause infections and damage to fatty tissue, DNA and proteins. Oxidative stress happens when there’s an imbalance between free radical activity and antioxidant activity. An antioxidant is a molecule that is able to donate an electron to a free radical without destabilizing itself.  The donation stabilizes the free radical, so it becomes less reactive.

But it’s not just humans that get oxidative stress – all animals do.  Nowadays, along with measuring an iguana for the usual length and weight, they are often examined for oxidative stress. Are our human activities increasing the oxidative stress in the native animals around us?  Sadly, yes. And it’s having negative effects on their health, as well.

I’ll be including some of these negative effects in upcoming books, such as Curtis Curly-tail Goes to the Doctor. In the meantime, if you’d like to learn about the what is being done to save the endangered Sister Island Rock Iguana, please read my book, Silent Rocks. It is for sale at Amazon.

cover of book "Silent Rocks." white background, rock iguana pictured in natural habitat on island Cayman Brac
The population of the endemic Sister Island Rock Iguana (Cyclura nubila caymanensis) on Cayman Brac is in serious decline. These vegetarian lizards are an important part of the island’s ecosystem. The reduction in population is the result of human activity on their habitat and the threats can only be eliminated by human action.
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January 21 is Squirrel Appreciation Day by Elaine A. Powers, Author

a gray and brown squireel sitting on a tree branch
An Eastern Gray Squirrel, Sciurus carolinensis in Corkscrew Swamp

I think squirrels are often maligned unjustly. People spend a lot of time and money trying to thwart them, but have you ever stopped to consider their ingenuity at overcoming the obstacles we put in their way? After all, they are just doing what they need to do to survive.

Squirrels are small to medium-sized rodents. They are native to the Americas, Eurasia, and Africa. They live in almost every habitat, from tropical rain forests to semiarid deserts. They are predominantly herbivores, eating seeds and nuts, but many will eat insects and even small vertebrates, as well.

Many of us interact with local tree squirrels, trying to prevent them from getting into our bird feeders. It’s amazing how much effort we put into attempting to out think these rodents—and then failing. The industry producing supposedly squirrel-proof bird feeders in quite sizable.

Here in the Sonoran Desert, I enjoy my ground squirrels, as well as tree squirrels. I think of their extensive digging as aerating my soil. I often head into my yard when I take breaks from writing. The little ones sitting up on their hind legs to greet me always makes me smile. I don’t discourage them from sharing in the feeders’ contents. I simply add a bit more for them.

I’ve written books about turtles and fish and tortoises and lizards and snakes and birds and plants—and even a fairy!—but not any mammals. No, wait! There is a mammal, a hutia, in Curtis Curly-tail Hears a Hutia, but I can’t think of any others. (A hutia is an endangered rodent native to the Bahamas that has endangered the local ecosystem. Readers of this Curtis-tale tag along on his adventure and then must decide how to solve this conundrum.)

Tomorrow, please join me in appreciating squirrels, those adorable, ingenious rodents. And consider picking up a copy of Curtis Curly-tail Hears a Hutia for the budding scientist in your family.

A book cover with a Curly-tail lizard riding on the back of a Hutia, a rodent
Curtis Curly-tail and Horace Hutia become friends after declining hutia are brought to Warderick Wells. But when the hutia damage the cay’s ecosystem, what will the scientists do? You, the reader, help them decide.
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Lots of New Science Fun with Four New Books at Lyric Power Publishing!

Lyric Power Publishing LLC is proud to announce the arrival of four new books! Here at LPP we love weaving science into adventure tales and rhyming books. We love colorful, exciting illustrations. We hope you will enjoy three wonderful new additions to our book catalog and a special guest listing for Ricky Ricordi.

olive green book cover with illustrations of a hickatee and a sea turtle
The Cayman Islands have turtles that live both on land and in the sea. Hickatee lives on land and doesn’t belong in the sea, like the sea turtles. Do you know the differences? Come inside and learn about turtles, especially the marvelous hickatee.

 

A book cover with a blue sky, white clouds and brown booby birds on the beach
Meet the Brown Booby, a large sea bird which is a year-round resident only of Cayman Brac, They are not found at all in Grand Cayman or Little Cayman. These birds are a spectacular sight, soaring and gliding along the Bluff edge and the shore, diving for fish to feed their young, perching on rocks in the sun, then returning to their nesting colonies. With only about forty nesting pairs on the Brac, they are protected by Cayman law.

 

A golden orange book cover with a green catfish on the cover
Clarissa Catfish liked her new home at the Peoria Playhouse Children’s Museum, but she couldn’t see the exhibits or the children in her tank. How can a catfish see the sights when she needs to stay in the water? Come inside to find out and join Clarissa as she explores the marvelous museum.

 

a book cover of boy in jungle with iguana on shoulder
When Lorenzo finds an iguana in his garden, he has loads of fun bonding with his new pet, but soon realizes that the animal belongs in the wild.
Dominican children’s author Nelia Barletta recently released a second children’s book, RICKY RICORDI: THE ADVENTURES OF AN IGUANA, which educates children about conservation and the protection of endangered animals of the Dominican Republic. The book focuses on the Ricordi iguana, an endemic species of the Caribbean island and features illustrations by Argentinian artist/children’s illustrator Juan Manuel Moreno.
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Ricky Ricordi: The Adventures of An Iguana by Nelia Barletta now Available at Lyric Power Publishing

a book cover of boy in jungle with iguana on shoulderWhen Lorenzo finds an iguana in his garden, he has fun bonding with his new
pet, but soon realizes that the animal belongs in the wild.

Lyric Power Publishing, along with John Binns of the IRCF, recently assisted Dominican children’s author Nelia Barletta in the publication of the English version of her book about Ricky Ricordi. The delightful illustrations were created by Argentinian artist/children’s illustrator Juan Manuel Moreno. The English version is now available on Amazon.com.

Ricky Ricordi: The Adventures of an Iguana focuses on the Ricordi iguana, an endemic species of the Dominican Republic. The goal of this book is to educate children about conservation and the protection of endangered animals of the Dominican Republic. However, people around the world will enjoy this adventure tale.

Proceeds from the book are donated to Fundacion Abriendo Camino, an organization working to support disadvantaged children in Villas Agricolas, a marginalized neighborhood in Santo Domingo.

We encourage you to read this great adventure tale that is both entertaining and educational. Any story about an iguana is worthwhile reading!

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It’s National Bird Day Today and Who Doesn’t Love Birds? by Elaine A. Powers, Author

National Bird Day on January 5 was created to promote avian awareness.  You can participate in celebrating birds in a number of ways.  You can go outside and do some bird watching.  You can learn about birds, either your local feathered friends or birds of the world.  You can learn about the decreasing populations of birds and what you can do to help preserve them.

A copper colored book cover featuring an illustration of a Roadrunner bird
“With vibrant illustrations by Nicholas Thorpe, this picture book is jam-packed with scientific facts about roadrunners, delivered in verse form to keep the narrative lively. Roadrunners “…grab their victim/behind its head/And bash it on/the ground until it is dead.” Want to know how to swallow a horned lizard? Keep reading!” AZ Daily Star

I live in Southern Arizona and I can’t tell you how much I enjoy sightings of one of my favorite locals, the Roadrunner. Talk about a fascinating bird! I write interesting facts about Roadies into a picture book called Don’t Make me Fly! Kids love the rhymes and illustrations, but I am a biologist and everyone learns something about roadrunners in this book. Science education is important to me, and I love making it fun.

a book cover with blue sky and white clouds, with Brown Booby birds on the beach next to a bush
All about the Brown Booby Birds of Cayman Brac by Bonnie Scott

 

 

I highly recommend a newly released book by my friend, Bonnie Scott. We share a love of conservation, iguanas, and the animals of Cayman Brac.  She recently published her book about the brown booby, Brown Booby Birds of Cayman Brac. It’s filled with her marvelous photographs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And I loved the island story of a lost juvenile brown booby and featured him in one of my books, Fly Back to the Brac, Brian Brown Booby, which is based on the true story of “Brian,” who was finally able to learn to fly and find his family. He’s pretty famous in the Brac.

book cover, blue sky, bird a brown booby is on beach near ocean
Brian Brown Booby, a young resident of Cayman Brac, finds himself stranded on a beach on Grand Cayman. It’s too far back for a booby to travel, even if Brian could fly, which he can’t. Does Brian make it back to the Brac? What happens to a booby that can’t fly? Based on a true story.
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Happy New Year! Happy New Decade! By Elaine A. Powers, Author

infographic of Elaine Powers with large hybrid iguanaWith the start of the New Year, we tend to establish goals for our productivity, and things we’d like to change or improve.  According to the Gregorian calendar, January 1, 2020 starts a new decade. My goals for the new year and new decade are to dedicate my efforts to both furthering science education (in a fun and entertaining way, of course!), as well as increasing awareness of conservation. I enjoy sharing science with others, whether it be through my books or taking my reptiles into schools and other places.

If you live in a cold climate, may I suggest while inside, where it’s warm and comfy, reading a few of our books or completing the activities and coloring pages in the workbooks? Check them out here and at elaineapowers.com. If you’re in a warmer climate, I encourage you to take a walk outside and then finish the day with reading one of our colorful and rhyming books to a young one, or whipping out the crayons and markers to color and complete one of our interesting workbooks.

One of our goals in 2020 is to add the national education standard codes to the wonderful workbooks created for Lyric Power Publishing by Marilyn Buehrer. Our workbooks are comprehensive, interesting and fun, but they aren’t labeled with the standards, which home-schooling parents and teachers need to know.

If there are other ways that Lyric Power Publishing, LLC, can assist you in meeting your educational needs, please contact me at iginspired@gmail.com.

I can tell already that 2020 is going to be an exciting year.  There will be more books, more talks, more videos, and many more posts at the blog. Please follow along as life unfolds with my multitude of reptiles, one horse, and an occasional visiting dog, on this merry journey of mine.

May 2020 be a happy, healthy, fun, and educational year for you and yours!

 

 

infographic about "Don't" series books

a light green and dark green book cover with the image of a duck in water

a yellow and green book cover with an image of a desert tortoise

a yellow and green book cover with an image of a fruit bat and a common rat

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The Honduran Bay Islands Iguanas Need Protection by Elaine A. Powers, Author

Infographic with woman holding Spiny-tail Iguana
My all-time favorite Spiny-tailed iguana, Krinkle, who died earlier this year. He is greatly missed.

Attending an IUCN ISG meeting, I had the chance to visit the Bay Islands, in northern Honduras.  The endemic iguanas need protection there.  I had previously been told that is was safe to visit the Bay Islands (Islas de la Bahia), and that most people spoke English in a country whose first language was Spanish.

The primary islands of Utila, Roatan, and Guanaja are located in the Caribbean Sea. The Bay Islands were first noted by Columbus in 1502 and were settled in 1642 by English buccaneers. Great Britain annexed them in 1852 but ceded them to Honduras in 1859. Many tourists visit the islands today for scuba diving.

Roatan Spiny Tailed Iguana
Roatan Spiny Tailed Iguana

My interest is, of course, iguanas. All the iguanas found in Honduras need protection. Roatán Spiny-tailed Iguanas (Ctenosaura oedirhina) are found only in one place in the world: on the island of Roatán. On Utila, there are three native iguanas, but only one is endemic: The Útila Spiny-tailed Iguana (Ctenosaura bakeri), or “Swamper,” as it is known locally. Swampers are the only iguana that live in mangrove swamps. They prefer the black mangroves, (Avicennia germinans), which have crevices for hiding.

Swamper Iguana
Swamper Iguana

Hopefully, people within and outside of Honduras will work together for their conservation.

To learn more about these fascinating really big lizards, why not download our workbook full of fun and educational activity sheets, called My Unit Study on Iguanas?

a white and light blue book cover with an image of an iguana's head

See all of our comprehensive workbooks here.

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Enjoy the Holiday Season! by Elaine A. Powers, Author

metal coast guard lighthouse decorated with red bows against blue sky
Coast Guard Lighthouse at Sanibel Island

Where are you spending this holiday season? I enjoy spending the holidays at my mother’s house in Ft. Myers, FL, in an RV park across from Sanibel Island. I have very fond memories of Sanibel. My family spent many vacations there, back when the ferry took everyone across to the island before the causeway was built.

During my 2018 holiday stay, I went to visit the lighthouse where I had worked with the Youth Conservation Corps. The J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge had its office on this Coast Guard lighthouse site. The Fort Myers area, including Sanibel, had the typical Christmas and holiday decorations. Even the lighthouse had been festooned. But I always preferred the decoration that nature provided, the magnificent osprey!

ospreys in nest
Osprey Image by PublicDomainPictures from Pixabay

The authors and staff of Lyric Power Publishing would like to wish all Happy Holidays–a Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Kwanzaa Blessings, Happy Yalda Day, Happy Pancha Ganapati, and Blessings of the Winter Solstice!

desert Bird ornament
Happy Holidays from Lyric Power Publishing!